Quality of Life Concepts

Secondary Health Conditions

Life Satisfaction Index-A (LSIA)

Description: A self-rating measure of zest for life; fortitude; congruence between desired and achieved goals; physical, psychological, and social self-concept; and mood tone.

Format: 20 items requiring the respondent to either agree, disagree, or declare uncertainty about each statement.

Scoring: Items are rated on an ordinal scale ranging from 1 (very dissatisfying) to 6 (very satisfying). Summing of the scores is not recommended.

Administration and Burden: Self-administered; Approximately 10 minutes.

Psychometrics for SCI: Not available; From the general population, the scale has been found to have acceptable internal consistency (α = .76), as well as satisfactory concurrent validity with other measures of life satisfaction.

Languages: English

QoL Concept: The LSIA measures life satisfaction, which corresponds to Box E of Dijker’s Model.

Permissions/Where to Obtain: Public domain; The LSIA may be obtained in the original journal article:

Neugarten BJ, Havighurst RJ, Tobin SS. The measurement of life satisfaction. J Gerontol 1961: 16: 134-43.

CLICK ON THE LISTED SECONDARY HEALTH CONDITIONS ON THE LEFT TO READ HOW THE LSIA HAS BEEN USED WITH A PARTICULAR CONDITION


Pain SCI Studies: One cross-sectional survey.

  1. Rintala DH, Loubser PG, Castro J, Hart KA, Fuhrer MJ. Chronic pain in a community-based sample of men with spinal cord injury: prevalence, severity, and relationship with impairment, disability, handicap, and subjective well-being. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1998;79:604-14.

Sensitivity to Impact: Rintala and colleagues (1998) used a battery of tests, including the Zung Pain and Distress Scale, to assess the prevalence, severity, and correlates of chronic pain in a community-based sample of men with SCI (N = 77). Chronic pain was associated with more depressive symptoms, more perceived stress, and poorer self-assessed health. Life satisfaction (assessed via the Life Satisfaction Index-A [LSIA]) was negatively correlated with perceived stress and depressive symptoms. There also was a significant continuous correlation between the Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique (CHART) social integration score and the Perceived Stress Scale.

Suggestions for Use: The LSIA has been used in several studies with persons with SCI, however further work is needed to justify its use and determine its clinical utility. In addition, preliminary evidence shows that it lacks sensitivity to assessing the impact of chronic pain after SCI. 

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