Quality of Life Concepts

Secondary Health Conditions

Community Activities Checklist (CAC)

Description: A measure of community involvement [1].

Format: 16 items assessing the number of times a person has participated in activities that pertain to social activities (7 items), mobility (4 items), and attention-to-self activities (5 items) within the last 7 days.

Scoring: The values in each item are summed to yield an overall score.

Administration and Burden: Approximately 5 minutes.

Psychometrics for SCI: Not available.

Languages: English.

QoL Concept: The CAC measures Community Participation, which corresponds to Boxes B (societal standards and priorities) and C (achievements; participation) of Dijker’s Model.

Permissions/Where to Obtain: Not available.

References:

  1. Kemp BJ, Ettelson D. Quality of life while living and aging with a spinal cord injury and other impairments. Top Spinal Cord Inj Rehabil. 2001;6:116–27.

CLICK ON THE LISTED SECONDARY HEALTH CONDITIONS ON THE LEFT TO READ HOW THE CAC HAS BEEN USED WITH A PARTICULAR CONDITION


Pain SCI Studies: One cross-sectional survey.

  1. Gutierrez DD, Thompson L, Kemp B, Mulroy SJ. The relationship of shoulder pain intensity to quality of life, physical activity, and community participation in persons with paraplegia. J Spinal Cord Med 2007;30:251-5.

Sensitivity to Impact: Gutierrez and colleagues (2007) examined the relationship between self-reported shoulder pain with quality of life (QoL), physical activity, and community activities in persons with paraplegia resulting from spinal cord injury (SCI; N = 80). Main outcome measures were: the Wheelchair User's Shoulder Pain Index (WUSPI), the Subjective Quality of Life (SQoL) Scale, the Physical Activity Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities (PASIPD), and the Community Activities Checklist (CAC). 

Shoulder pain was inversely related to SQoL (p = .002), and there was a moderate, inverse, relationship between shoulder pain intensity and physical activity (p < .0001), but no relationship between shoulder pain intensity and community activities.  Hence, some persons were able to maintain high levels of community activity despite their shoulder pain.

Suggestions for Use: The CAC assesses mostly social activities that do not necessarily require mobility, which may account for why it is not sensitive to the impact of shoulder pain.  Further work is recommended to establish the psychometric properties and clinical utility of this measure for the SCI population.

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