Quality of Life Concepts

Secondary Health Conditions

Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ)

Description: A measure of coping with pain [1].

Format:  The CSQ consists of 6 cognitive (diverting attention, reinterpreting pain sensations, coping self-statements, ignoring pain sensations, praying or hoping, and catastrophizing) and one behavioural (increasing activity level) pain coping scales.

Scoring: Items are rated on a scale ranging from 0 (never do) to 6 (always do that when in pain).

Administration and Burden: Interviewer-administered; Self-administered. Approximately 5 minutes.

Psychometrics for SCI: Not available.

Languages: English.

QoL Concept: The CSQ is a measure of Subjective Well-Being that assesses coping, which corresponds to Box E (subjective evaluations and reactions; self-efficacy) of Dijker’s Model.

Permissions/Where to Obtain: Unknown / Please review reference below to determine where to obtain.

References:

  1. Rosenstiel AK, Keefe FJ. The use of coping strategies in chronic low back pain patients: relationship to patient characteristics and current adjustment. Pain 1983;17:33–44.

CLICK ON THE LISTED SECONDARY HEALTH CONDITIONS ON THE LEFT TO READ HOW THE CSQ HAS BEEN USED WITH A PARTICULAR CONDITION


Pain SCI Studies: Two cross-sectional surveys.

  1. Turner JA, Jensen MP, Warms CA, Cardenas DD. Catastrophizing is associated with pain intensity, psychological distress, and pain-related disability among individuals with chronic pain after spinal cord injury. Pain 2002;98:127-34.

  2. Giardino ND, Jensen MP, Turner JA, Ehde DM, Cardenas DD. Social environment moderates the association between catastrophizing and pain among persons with a spinal cord injury. Pain 2003;106:19-25.

Sensitivity to Impact: Turner and colleagues (2002) used the mental health scale of the Short-Form 36 (SF-36), the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ), and the Chronic Pain Grade Scale (CPGS) to examine associations of catastrophizing and specific pain coping strategies with pain intensity, psychological distress, and pain-related disability in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) and chronic pain. Results showed that pain coping and catastrophizing measures explained an additional 29% of the variance in pain intensity after adjusting for the demographic and SCI variables. The coping and catastrophizing scales accounted for an additional 30% of the variance in psychological distress and 11% of the variance in pain-related disability, after controlling for pain intensity and demographic and SCI variables.

Giardino and colleagues (2003) examined how social factors would moderate the association between catastrophizing and sensory and affective pain in persons with SCI (N = 74). The significant interaction with catastrophizing and sensory pain was stronger in those who lived with a spouse or partner than those who lived with someone else. There also was a stronger association between catastrophizing and affective pain in those who reported greater solicitousness in their relationship.

Suggestions for Use:

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