Quality of Life Concepts

Secondary Health Conditions

Constant Murley Scale (CMS)

Description: A shoulder-specific outcome measure [1].

Format:  The CMS is a 100-point scale composed of a number of individual parameters. These parameters define the degree of pain the patient experiences and the ability to perform normally daily living tasks.

Scoring: The degree of pain experienced is rated on a scale from 0 to 15, and the ability to perform normal tasks of daily activity is rated on a scale from 0 to 20 points. In addition, objective testing of active motion range is measured on a scale from 0 to 40, and shoulder power on a scale from 0 to 25.

Administration and Burden: Interviewer-administered.

Psychometrics for SCI: Not available.

Languages: English, Dutch.

QoL Concept: The CMS is an Objective and Subjective measure of shoulder impairment, which corresponds to Boxes C (achievements; activities of daily living) and E (subjective evaluations and reactions) of Dijker’s Model.

Permissions/Where to Obtain: Not available.

References:

  1. Constant CR. An evaluation of the Constant-Murley shoulder assessment. J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1997;79:695–6.

CLICK ON THE LISTED SECONDARY HEALTH CONDITIONS ON THE LEFT TO READ HOW THE CMS HAS BEEN USED WITH A PARTICULAR CONDITION


Pain SCI Studies: One cross-sectional survey.

  1. Samuelsson KAM, Tropp H, Gerdle B. Shoulder pain and its consequences in paraplegic spinal cord-injured wheelchair users. Spinal Cord 2004;42:41-6.

Sensitivity to Impact: Samuelsson and colleagues (2004) used the Wheelchair User's Shoulder Pain Index (WUSPI), the Constant Murle Scale (CMS), the Klein & Bell ADL Index, and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) to describe the consequences of shoulder pain on activity and participation in persons with paraplegia (N = 56). No correlation was found between the various descriptions of impairment, activity limitations and participation restriction (P>0.08).

Suggestions for Use: Further work to establish the psychometric properties and clinical utility of the CMS for use in the SCI population is recommended.

0 READER COMMENTS  [post comment]